Abandoned ireland

 

Glynwood House

Westmeath

Documenting our Heritage

In 1837 the Glynwood estate was described as 'a large and beautiful seat with extensive premises, having on its eastern, southern and western sides extensive ornamental grounds, verged and intersected with plantations of trees in continuity'.


John Longworth of Glynwood died without issue in 1881 and was succeeded by his cousin Francis Travers Dames Longworth, who immediately proceeded to completely alter the mansion, with Sir George Moyers, LL.D as his architect.


The reconstruction work was probably completed by 1884, which date is carved on a keystone in the coach yard.


Tradition says that Mr. Longworth inherited about £100,000 from an extinct branch of the family, with the provision that it be used in improving the estate.


The famous Glynwood Hereford cattle herd was founded on the Glynwood estate in 1883 and from 1908 until 1920 achieved results at the Royal Dublin Society's shows that will probably  never be equalled.


Many Irish herds stem from the dispersal sale of the Glynwood herd.


Glynwood House was accidentally burned in 1917 or 1918, all the family and staff then went to live in Creggan House. Creggan house was then burnt by the Irish Republican forces on the same night as, and for the same reasons as Moydrum Castle in 1920.


Glynwood has since been largely demolished to supply bricks for other local houses, and the cut stone balustrades ornament local gardens.


In 1921 the surviving estate and buildings were purchased by William Nash, whose son and family still live in the area.

Glynwood
House
Westmeath
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